Black Friday Tips to Save You Money

2 weeks ago Jack 0

“Black Friday” became a national sensation over the last few decades. Deal analysis before hand and coverage of the circus-like (or prison riot-like) behavior of shoppers dominate news sources around the country. Well, I’m going to contribute to the hype a little here. I’ll also give you a few tips to keep money in your wallet and avoid being fooled by the stores.

Just Because a Product Gets Advertised for Black Friday Doesn’t Make It a Deal

Sometimes the appearance of a deal can be enough of an incentive to customers as a deal itself. Do your research ahead of time. You’ll find that stores often advertise products at retail or street (commonly available) prices in their Black Friday promos in attempts to fool you into thinking you’re getting a better deal than you really are. Watch out for that. If you don’t you may end up spending more than you had to, feeling low because you thought you were getting a great deal, or have to drive or ship items back to stores to return them. It’s not fun and just ends up costing you more.

 

If You Do Find a Deal, Don’t Buy Unless You Need It

I’m using the word “need” loosely here. Still, buying things just because they’re on sale is the best way to get suckered out of your money. We all know that having more things doesn’t make us happy. So when you buy things just because the price is uncommonly low, all that ends up happening is you get something you don’t want and lose money you’ll wish you had for something else later. The only good price for something you don’t need is $0.

 

Make a List and Focus

Once you’ve found out which deals are actually deals and which things you actually need, make a list. Focus on those things and get them. If you have too many options you’ll waste time and loose track of what’s important. Everything around Black Friday is going to look like a shiny deal. If you made a plan to buy a TV for your family for Christmas, stick to the one you picked out that’s in your budget, the right size, has the right specs, and is a good deal. That next model up that Bestbuy really wants to sell you is not on your list. If you already examined it and ruled it out, then stick with your decision and stay away.

 

Plan Your Trips

Sometimes you have to show up to retail stores early to get deals. Plot out which stores have which deals at what times. Do your best to prioritize your shopping list and plan out when you have to be in place to get the deal. For instance, if a sweater for Billy is on sale all weekend but Dad’s waffle maker is only priced right until noon, plan to go for the waffle maker first.

Also, try to plan to go to the right areas. Look at your total drive time and the weather. Sometimes it’s worth driving an extra 5-10 miles from home if all of the stores you need are right near each other out there. Hoping 10 miles between each of 5 stores (and home) would take you 60 miles round trip. If all 5 stores are in the same shopping center 20 miles away, you might spend lot less time traveling by going to the further one.

 

Keep You Sanity and Humanity

If the deal is really important to you, then you should at least know the risk. I no longer go out for “door busters” because I’ve seen terrible behavior from people at those times. Stores get trashed, people throw things, tempers flare. It’s not pretty. Anything you can do online for the same price, you should. Often you end up saving more time ordering online because of free shipping offers. I’m a God fearing person and hate to be involved in behavior that prioritized money over people. Even though I work hard to stretch my hard earned money, I will pay more if it means that I can treat other people with respect and dignity while avoiding losing my temper with ill-mannered folk desperate to get products.

If you feel that getting deals is taking too much priority in your life over God and others, especially around Black Friday, then stop, step back, and give up on the deals. Even if shopping later cost you a lot more than shopping now, there’s no price that isn’t worth setting your priorities straight.